NEABPD Needs Your Help

Since August 2001 when NEABPD was founded by several family members, consumers, and one professional, the volunteers who are the core of the organization have worked on many projects, including over 55 conferences, Family Connections and TeleConnections programs, two web sites with 100+ videos, books and pamphlets, and Congressional Resolution HR 1005 designating May as Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month. We thank the family members, professionals, consumers, and researchers who have given and continue to give their support so freely.

But, as you probably know all too well, BPD is an under-diagnosed and under-serviced disorder, and further work is needed to make treatment more readily available. Too many people struggle in silence and on their own. Funding is needed to develop a new generation of BPD researchers. Mental health professionals need access to training and the means to update their knowledge. Programs to help families need to be available. There’s much work to be done.

We invite you to support NEABPD’s initiatives. NEABPD is a 501(c)3 charitable organization, and as such, donations are tax deductible. Many companies will match employees’ donations to non-profit organizations, so don’t forget to apply if you have that benefit at your workplace. NEABPD’s Family Connections program provides skills and information to families who struggle with a family member with Borderline Personality Disorder. The program – over ten years old – is now taught throughout the United States, and worldwide in Ireland, Italy, Australia and over a dozen other countries. That growth – and the vital work the program does – could not have happened without the generous support of the individuals and organizations listed below. NEABPD warmly thanks them for their contributions on behalf of all those whose lives have been changed through the Family Connections Educational Programs.

There are many ways to donate to NEABPD.  Select the one that is easiest for you.

Send a check to

NEABPD
52 White Beeches
Township of Washington, NJ 07676

Venmo NEABPD using this QR code

Donate via PayPal




National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization and all donations are tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.
Our EIN number Is: 30-0033269.  

Thank You!

Real people. Real stories.

We wandered in the wilderness…lost and alone. Our daughter is now in her early 30’s and has suffered, we believe, since her early teens. She’s been misdiagnosed and mistreated by well-meaning but ill-equipped therapists and bad psychiatrists solely focused on prescribing medications.

As we think back, it breaks my heart to see how much pain she went through: obsessions; fear of abandonment; outbursts of anger and fury that appeared suddenly; expressions of self-doubt; volatile and unhealthy relationships; detachment during family and individual conversations; and most difficult of all were the suicide attempts.

Read Jim and Joyce's Story

We wandered in the wilderness…lost and alone. Our daughter is now in her early 30’s and has suffered, we believe, since her early teens. She’s been misdiagnosed and mistreated by well-meaning but ill-equipped therapists and bad psychiatrists solely focused on prescribing medications. As we think back, it breaks my heart to see how much pain she went through: obsessions; fear of abandonment; outbursts of anger and fury that appeared suddenly; expressions of self-doubt; volatile and unhealthy relationships; detachment during family and individual conversations; and most difficult of all were the suicide attempts.

For our part, my wife and I constantly encouraged her and tried to be positive. You can do it! Don’t worry, you’ll get that job! I can help prepare you for the interview. Sure, go back to school. You were always a great student. You can do anything you put your mind to. You have plenty of friends. Everyone knows you’re a good person.

To our friends and relatives, our daughter was constantly being judged. She was lazy or antisocial or too quiet. She wasn’t like everyone else. She wasn’t accepted. She could do better if she just tried harder. In truth, we, as her parents, judged her to. We had expectations. We tried our best to be good parents and provide the best environment for her. It worked for our other two kids! Look at them! They are successful professionals.

Well, nothing worked. We felt alone. There was no one we could talk to. We had no support. No one understood what we were going through. Our daughter made her 2nd suicide attempt in the summer of 2018. She was hospitalized where she finally began receiving appropriate help from knowledgeable professionals. After her discharge from the psych ward, she continued participating in a couple of outpatient programs.

In a better place and feeling encouraged, she had a sense of what to look for in seeking professional help. She collected a list of reputable and well-regarded psychiatrists. The new psychiatrist she selected finally gave her an accurate diagnosis – you have BPD. She also recommended that she try dialectical behavioral therapy. Unfortunately, there aren’t a lot of certified DBT therapists. Again, she did her research and landed on the right one for her and began receiving DBT therapy in Oct 2018. During her initial sessions, we were contacted by the practice where she was receiving help. They were hosting a meeting for family members with a loved one receiving DBT therapy. We jumped at the chance to participate. It turned out that we attended the Family Connections class.

We’ve gotten so much out of NEABPD Family Connections. FC gave us information, knowledge and the latest research so that we can better understand what our daughter was going through. She didn’t have a choice about this. She wasn’t manipulating us. She wasn’t intentionally being difficult. We realized, now, how much pain she was suffering. We stopped blaming her. We stopped judging her.

It was such a relief to know that there were others in the same boat. We didn’t have to suffer alone. We shared what was going on with each other’s BPD person. We talked about our experiences, worries, successes, failures and learnings. We were there for each other. The people we met in class became some of our closest friends…to this day.

FC taught us so many skills to help provide a more supportive environment for our daughter. We learned skills to help us reduce our own suffering too. I like to think the skills we’ve learned apply to all the relationships I have – personally and professionally. Attending FC was such a beneficial experience that I accepted the invitation to become a FC leader. I was motivated to give back and help others. I also believe in the adage that if you want to learn something…teach it. As a FC leader, I want to be at the top of my game because I want to give my best to class participants. I’ve now co-led 3 classes. I probably get more out of teaching these classes than the attendees

Family Connections came into my life during a time when I felt alone and hopeless about my relationship with my mother and my brother who both navigate life with emotion dysregulation.

I struggled for so long to understand their behaviors and futilely tried to make sense of their emotions; walking a deeply lonely path. At the time, I believed no one in the world understood this unique heartache and I suffered tremendously.

Read Liza's Story

Family Connections came into my life during a time when I felt alone and hopeless about my relationship with my mother and my brother who both navigate life with emotion dysregulation. I struggled for so long to understand their behaviors and futilely tried to make sense of their emotions; walking a deeply lonely path. At the time, I believed no one in the world understood this unique heartache and I suffered tremendously.

When I had the opportunity to join a Family Connections class in 2011, I felt doubtful but curious, and willing to try anything that could help. Over the course of that first class, I learned from an incredible group of people that others not only understood, but had walked the same path I had.

Together we learned vital education about emotion dysregulation, essential family dynamics, critical relationship skills, self-validation and compassion, and a new understanding for the unique struggles our loved ones faced. I came away belonging to a new community of “VIP” family members like me.

Family Connections transformed nearly every aspect of my relationships with my loved ones, but it also changed how I thought about myself and my family’s struggles.

I have become empowered to hold boundaries, more empathic towards the suffering of others, a better communicator of my experiences, a better listener to those I love, and I prioritize the practice of self-validation and checking in with myself each day. I have allowed myself to grieve, healed my hopelessness with radical acceptance, and freed myself to have genuine connections with my mother and brother; to see them as doing the best they can in each moment, and to appreciate who they are as people for whom emotion dysregulation is only just one part.

A decade since that first class, there are tough moments and hard days; I have definitely “made it worse” in some of those moments! But, I no longer feel alone or despair. I have remained connected to a wonderful community of leaders, alumni, and incredible adult children and siblings.

The Family Connections program taught me how to make meaningful changes that have truly shifted the course of my relationships towards love, growth and understanding. Today, the relationships I have with my loved ones are the strongest they have ever been, and I am no longer alone on my path but surrounded by many paths traveled by family members learning and growing with me.

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