7th Annual Yale BPD Conference April 14th and 15th, 2011 Details

Empirically Supported Therapies for Borderline Personality Disorder:
Common and Distinguishing Aspects of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)
and Mentalization Based Therapy (MBT)
Featuring Anthony Bateman, M.D. and Alan Fruzzetti, Ph.D.

7th Annual Yale BPD Conference
April 14th and 15th, 2011

Program Details with Presentation Objectives

Day 1: Expert Discussions and Demonstrations
Thursday April 14th

8:00 amRegistration and Coffee
8:30 amWelcome and Orientation to the dayPerry D. Hoffman, PhD, Seth R. Axelrod, PhD, Anthony Bateman, MD, and Alan Fruzzetti, PhD
9:00 amMBT and DBT: Is the goal integration?PRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to identify challenges involved with integrating disparate theoretical models of psychotherapy in the treatment of borderline personality disorder.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe the successes and challenges of the effort to integrate MBT and DBT at McLean Hospital.
  3. Attendees will be able to explain the importance of establishing an empirical groundwork based on integration research before proceeding toward clinical integration applications.
Lois Choi-Kain, MD
with response from Drs. Bateman and Fruzzetti
9:45 amThe following six sessions will each include two of the six MBT expert presenters (from Drs. Bateman, Choi-Kain, Dowden, Kissell, and Kupper, and Mr. Smith) and two of the DBT expert presenters (from Drs. Foertsch, Fruzzetti, Payne, Reynolds, Rizvi, and Simpson):PRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:Session 1a. Treatment frame and orientation to therapy

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to establishing the treatment frame and orientation to therapy, and illustrate their methods through clinical role-plays.
  2. Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in the process of establishing patient and therapist roles and therapy goals, and expectations regarding topics such as missed sessions, discussion of early life issues, and therapy termination.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.

Session 1b. Challenges in the therapy relationship

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to establishing the therapy relationship, and illustrate their methods through clinical role-plays.
  2. Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in this process, such as patient wishing to quit treatment, patient having inconsistent self-report, patient hostility, and patient idealizing the therapist.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.

Session 1c. Self-destructive behaviors

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to responding to self-destructive behaviors, and illustrate their methods through clinical role-plays.
  2.  Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in the process of managing situations in which the patient threatens suicide or self-harm, has recently engaged in suicide or self-harm, or struggles with other impulsive behaviors such as eating, spending, or promiscuity.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.
12:30 pmLunch
(Information on area eateries will be available on-site)
1:30 pmSession 2 (15 min break at about 2:45)PRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:a. Interface with systems of care

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to responding to interactions with other systems of care (e.g., after hours contact, and communications with psychopharmacologists, other therapists, social service agencies, and inpatient units), and illustrate their methods through clinical role-plays.
  2. Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in the process of phone contact with the patient, the patient requesting that therapist communicate with other providers, and the need for hospitalization.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.

b. Improving functioning

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to responding to efforts to improve patient functioning, and illustrate their methods through clinical role-plays.
  2. Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in the process of helping the patient improve family functioning, work functioning, hopeless and self-deprecation, and other clinical problems, such as depression, social anxiety, PTSD, and eating disorders.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.

c. Therapist self-care

  1. Attendees will compare MBT and DBT experts’ responses to clinical vignettes of outpatient therapy patients in relation to therapist self-care.
  2. Attendees will differentiate how each treatment approaches challenges that occur in the process of managing anger or frustration toward the patient, hopelessness about the therapy, and fears about the patient’s or the therapist’s safety.
  3. Attendees will be able to describe which clinical behaviors are essentially the same across the two treatment models and which behaviors distinguish MBT and DBT.
4:00 pmBreak
4:15 pmDiscussion of the day’s findingsPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will review explorations of the similarities and differences of the MBT and DBT treatment models in relation to the other.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe what tentative conclusions may be drawn from the various explorations of the day.
  3. Attendees will formulate questions to continue exploring this topic along with the treatment experts.
Drs. Bateman and Fruzzetti and
MBT and DBT experts
5:15 pmClosing Remarks and Adjourn

Day 2: Main Conference Day
Friday, April 15th

8:00 amRegistration and Coffee
8:30 amWelcomePerry D. Hoffman, PhD and
Seth R. Axelrod, PhD
Opening RemarksModerator for the day: Seth R. Axelrod, PhDJohn Krystal, MD
8:45 amOverview of the BPD Diagnosis and ChallengesPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to describe the developing BPD diagnosis, including its history, findings from neuroscience, and anticipated changes in the DSM-V.
  2. Attendees will be able to specify common treatment challenges for patients, clinicians, and families.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify the increasing list of empirically-supported therapies for BPD, including DBT and MBT.
Seth Axelrod, PhD
9:30 amMentalization Based Therapy (MBT)PRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1.  Attendees will be able to categorize the various facets of mentalization.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe how MBT is applied to individuals with BPD.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify the typical MBT therapist behavior within the individual therapy setting.
Anthony Bateman, MD
10:30 amBreak
10:45 amDialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)PRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to list the essential modes and functions of dialectical behavior therapy.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe the core DBT strategies of acceptance, change, and dialectics, and refer to research that supports the use of acceptance in change in the psychotherapy process.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify the components of DBT-adherent individual therapy.
Alan Fruzzetti, PhD
11:45 amConsumer and Family PerspectivesPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to identify challenges that are typical for individuals and family members who struggle with borderline personality disorder (BPD).
  2. Attendees will be able to recall personal stories of encountering the BPD diagnosis.
  3. Attendees will be able to list examples of personal anecdotes of interacting with treatment systems and support options.
Kiera Van Gelder, MFA and
Marie-Paule de Valdivia, MBS
1:30 pmClinical demonstrations of MBT and DBTPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to relate their understanding of MBT to a patient-therapist role play illustrating the practice of MBT to borderline personality disorder.
  2. Attendees will be able to relate their understanding of DBT to a patient-therapist role play illustrating the practice of DBT to this same clinical presentation.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify common and distinguishing aspects of the two treatments in relation to these two immediate examples.
Drs. Bateman and Fruzzetti
2:30 pmPanel Discussion:
Common and distinguishing features of MBT and DBTPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to list conclusions from MBT and DBT experts on common, compatible, and distinguishing features of MBT and DBT.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe how MBT and DBT experts worked to find a common understanding of the specific strengths of each treatment.
  3. Attendees will be able to identify specific therapy interventions that are evidence based practices supported by both of these empirically supported treatments.
Drs. Shauna Dowden, Christine Foertsch, Daniel Kupper, and Elizabeth Simpson, with response from Drs. Bateman and Fruzzetti
3:30 pmBreak
3:45 pmPanel Discussion: Conclusions and future directionsPRESENTATION OBJECTIVES:

  1. Attendees will be able to list conclusions from MBT and DBT experts regarding the various analyses comparing MBT and DBT with regard to clinical practice.
  2. Attendees will be able to describe how the findings of this conference could be applied to future research aimed at improving each of the treatments
  3. Attendees will be able to identify how the findings of the conference could be applied more broadly to future research on improving care for individuals with borderline personality disorder.
Drs. Lois Choi-Kain, Robin Kissell, Sarah Reynolds, and Shireen Rizvi, with response from Drs. Bateman and Fruzzetti
5:00 pmClosing Remarks and Adjourn
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